The sorry state of F1

Its become no secret recently that F1 is in a miserable financial state. With the withdrawal of Marussia and Caterham from the upcoming Grand Prix due to sugarcoated bankruptcy, the sport’s fundamental management and operation policies have been cast in further doubt.

For me, responsibility lies with those who claim it. Yes, I am pointing the finger towards you, Bernie Ecclestone. Uncle Ben once said, ‘with great power comes great responsibility’. The captain of the ship is the one responsible if some of the crew fall off-board because the ship isn’t able to support them.

The warning bells ahead of Caterham and Marussia’s withdrawal were ringing loud and clear, too. Williams, a team stooped in F1 history, had financial concerns that were well documented when the team was languishing at the bottom of the grid a couple of seasons back. Lotus failing to pay Kimi Raikkonen’s wages in the latter part of last season, followed by their decision to hire Pastor Maldonado – widely perceived as a ‘pay driver’ – are all symptoms of the crippled financial state the team was in. Even the almighty Mercedes were threatening to exit the sport if the team wasn’t able to reach a position where it can consistently fight for world championships.

F1 needs a change. Surely, a man who can’t get through a revolving door and thinks having sprinklers on F1 tracks is a good idea is way past heading a sport worth billions of dollars. The majority of fans have not a single clue as to why some teams are struggling to stay afloat. There is no transparency whatsoever regarding how money is distributed and how much teams are spending just to keep ahead of their day-to-day expenditures.

The system is flawed, and the man at the head of it is defiant, sticking to his controversial and questionable policies amid obvious dire results. Sounds like an Arab Spring country, no? Well it sure does to me, and if past trends are anything to go by, then change is imminent and is only a matter of time…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s